Climate: According to the UN, heat waves will make entire regions uninhabitable

Science Thousands of dead already

According to the UN, heat waves will make entire regions uninhabitable

Extreme temperatures – “The trend has been completely upwards since 1960”

“The last four years have been particularly warm,” says meteorologist Alexander Hildebrand. In the WELT studio, he makes a temperature and rain balance and shows the future challenges, especially for agriculture.

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According to the United Nations climate report, entire regions of the world will be uninhabitable within a few decades. Heat waves would then exceed the physical limits of humans.

EAccording to a report by the UN and the Red Cross, extreme heat waves will make entire regions of the world uninhabitable for humans in just a few decades. If climate change continues as before, heatwaves in areas such as the Sahel, the Horn of Africa and South and Southwest Asia would exceed human “physical and social boundaries,” the UN and the Red Cross warned Monday in a joint statement. report in Geneva. “Great suffering and loss of life” would be the consequences.

According to the report, heat waves are the greatest meteorological hazard in all regions for which reliable statistics are available. Thousands of people are affected by heat waves every year.

Rhineland-Palatinate, Bingen, in summer: on the rocks of the largely dried-up riverbed of the Rhine lies a children’s bicycle covered with dried mussels and algae

Source: dpa/Frank Rumpenhorst

UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Martin Griffiths and Secretary-General of the International Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent (ICRC), Jagan Cahpagain, said the number of deaths will increase year on year as climate change progresses.

Experts predict that the number of deaths from extreme heat will be as high as the number of cancer deaths worldwide by the end of the century. The report was published just under a month before the UN climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt.

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